Retailers Still Working on Mastering E-Commerce Model

Retailers Still Working on Mastering E-Commerce Model

March 2016E-commerce

Nordstrom is struggling, and e-commerce (and perhaps shipping costs) might be partly to blame. That’s according to a recent Bloomberg.com story by Shelly Banjo.

The luxury retailer has seen the price of its shares plummet over the past year and missed its fourth-quarter earnings estimates last month. CFO Mike Koppel talked about Nordstrom’s rough stretch with Bloomberg.com, giving some insight into some of the issues retailers face as they split their focus between brick-and-mortar stores and selling products online.

E-commerce isn’t going away. Nordstrom expects that 30 percent of its sales will come online by 2020, compared to just 8 percent in 2010. But retailers don’t have as good a handle on the e-commerce model as they would like.

Brick-and-mortar stores might seem increasingly old fashioned, but retailers knew how to plan for that model. You build your store. You train your staff. Once you paid off those initial overhead costs, the profits flow in–ideally!

Selling online brings the benefit of low overhead (less of a need for labor and physical stores). But the more retailers like Nordstrom sell online, the more they have to spend to collect and ship the goods to customers. It all adds up!

Nordstrom is trying to catch up to e-commerce competitors like Amazon. But it’s finding that e-commerce isn’t always as profitable a business as physical stores. Nordstrom – and other retailers – will need to figure out the model soon.

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