Race for Amazon HQ2 Narrows; Questions Arise

Atlanta is seen as a favorite for Amazon HQ2 given its low cost of living and strong talent pool.

Jan. 29, 2018

The race is still on for the Amazon HQ2 project — a potential $5 billion construction bonanza that would bring 50,000 jobs. After 238 cities and regions in 54 locations (US and Toronto) submitted bids, Amazon recently announced the short list of 20 cities still in the running.

Before we get to the finalists, let’s take a look at some contrarian views coming out:

It’s all a sham, as the Washington, D.C. area (which has 3 finalists) has already been chosen, according to a recent Bisnow story.  The story points to Amazon founder Jeff Bezos’ new mega-mansion in the area as the critical link to those sites. Executives do like to live near their offices, after all.

Others say it could all be a publicity stunt by Amazon. Look at all the good publicity and the scramble by government officials to appease Amazon.com. See more on that at axios.com.

Time will tell where the Amazon HQ2 goes and what the motivates are. Meantime, the official list of contenders includes Atlanta, Austin, Boston, Chicago, Columbus, Dallas, Denver, Indianapolis, L.A., …and several others. Here are a few snapshots of those that made the cut:

Atlanta

This southern city with $5.8M residents is considered a top contender due to its cost of living, strong talent pool and access to the world’s busiest airport. Traffic was cited as one negative issue, however.

This is how a Chicago Amazon HQ2 might look. Image from Goettsch Partners.

Chicago

Chicago made the cut and here’s what is pushing the city ahead, according to this Bisnow story. The proposal included 10 sites, many with large land areas for development. From Lincoln Yards to the old Michael Reese Hospital site to 700 W. Chicago (pictured here), the city proposal includes many land masses.

The incentives package included about $2B. One frontrunner, according to the story, is the old Chicago Tribune printing plant in River West, as it would connect downtown, River North, the Fulton Market and other neighborhoods.

 

Dallas

Dallas and Fort Worth are gaining attention for their strong supply of tech talent. And, the cost of living is much lower than other tech hubs, such as New York or San Francisco.

Columbus and Nashville are in, but neither has a major airports, which seems like a liability.

For a detailed look at which cities made the list — and why — see this money.com story.

Archives